Perl Regular Expression Awesomeness

来源:互联网 时间:1970-01-01


This week at work I overheard some coworkers talking about a programming problem. The type that you might get in an interview. The idea was that if you had a string of words smushed together without spaces, how would you go about parsing the string into words again?

I thought about it for a bit and pretty quickly decided to load all of /usr/share/dict/wordsinto some kind of regexp. The main difficultly is that you can't just be greedy or be nongreedy because either could fail. Imagine the inputs:

yougotmail => you got mailyougotmailed => you got mailedyougotmailman => you got mailman (or: you got mail man)yougotmailmanners => you got mail manners

As you can see, regardless of greedy or nongreedy, you need backtracking. Hmm. Regular expressions have backtracking. Problem solved!

$list = join '|', map {chomp, $_} `cat /usr/share/dict/words`;$input =~ /^($list)*$/;

That works! Only one little problem. How do I get the captured words? I thought I knew but I couldn't get it to work, so I asked Google. Google was not my friend, so I asked on #p5p. Fortunately the p5p regexp greats were around. Unfortunately they told me I couldn't really do that. At some point mauke++suggested I could try putting code into a modern Perl regexp.

Long story short I came up with this Perl regexp gem: https://gist.github.com/ingydotnet/94528c938ca94f684270

You can try it out like this:

$ echo yougotmailmanners | DEBUG=1 word-parse.plyougotmailmanmailmannersyou got mail manners

My favorite part of this is the local @stack = (@stack, $^N);. After each match we "push" the matched word (in $^N) onto a stack array; but we also localize the stack. This causes it to get reset to what we want when backtracking happens. That means there is no need for code to determine when a pop is needed.

I doubt this could be done much more elegantly in other languages. I'm sure that code invocation is supported in many newer language's regexp engines, but the localcall-stack semantics don't exist because they are deemed inferior. I've written more Bash code than any other language in the last couple years. Bash has the same local semantics. It actually works out pretty nice most of the time.

I suspect only Perl has such a modern regexp engine andthe "inferior" local semantics! :)



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